Week of Aug. 5– Aug. 11, 2007, Vol. 2, No. 42

Edited and Compiled for you, by the Rising Tide Collective

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Openings – “Listen.
In every office
you hear the threads
of love and joy and fear and guilt,
the cries for celebration and reassurance,
and somehow you know that connecting those threads
is what you are supposed to do
and business takes care of itself.”
-James Autry http://members.aol.com/jamesautry/ Openings is a weekly feature of Co-op Circles. Send your favourite quote about celebrating co-operatives, communities and a better world for all, to News1@nbnet.nb.ca

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This Week in Co-op Circles

·     A ten-member steering committee that was nominated at a March 19th session in Charlottetown (to which all Island co-ops and CUs were invited) has been working for the past four months on ways to harness the enthusiasm and commitment of the co-op sector into an effective and respected PEI Co-op Council. Progress has been slow but steady, and members of the PEI Steering Committee hope to be able to announce a significant milestone before Labour Day. Anybody wishing to know more about the process can contact peicoopcouncil@gmail.com  

·     Chief Executive Officer Camille Thériault, president and chef de la
direction of the Federation des Caisses Populaires Acadiennes, was elected chair of the Governance and Human Resources Committee of CUMIS at their board meeting in June.  http://www.peicreditunions.com/news/article.php?ID=574

·     The Newfoundland and Labrador Credit Union is celebrating its 50th Anniversary This Summer. It first commenced operation in 1957 as NTA Co-operative Credit Society with a first deposit of only 10 dollars. Throughout its fifty year history Newfoundland and Labrador Credit Union has had outstanding growth and is recognized for its service and innovation. It has since evolved into a full-service financial institution, while still remaining committed to its core values. Members can help the NLCU celebrate its 50th anniversary by using a Newfoundland and Labrador Credit Union ATM between July 18th and August 22nd and be surprised by a 50 dollar bill! For a complete list of all NLCU ATMS you can visit its website at: www.nlcu.com/Home/YourCreditUnion/Promotion - Danielle Higdon

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Trends – About a year ago, I ran across a reference to a conference series that was available on the web and via podcast. The TED conferences – TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design – started in 1984, and the ted.com Web site now makes over 100 of them available for viewing (broadband internet access is highly recommended). The annual conference, usually held in Monterey, California, brings together some of the world’s most fascinating thinkers and doers, who are challenged to “give the talk of their lives – in 18 minutes”.  The annual conference presents ‘ideas worth spreading’ and covers the gamut: Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon.com; Al Gore, author of An Inconvenient Truth; Jane Goodall, primatologist; Nicholas Negroponte, founder of MIT’s Media Labs; Sergey Brin and Larry Page, founders of Google; Tony Robbins, expert in Leadership psychology; Steven Levitt, economist and author of Freakonomics, Jacqueline Novogratz, founder of Acumen Fund; and even Natalie MacMaster, Cape Breton fiddler who appeared in 2002. If you recognize any of the names above, you realize the breadth of the talks. Some titles: “The Wisdom of Designing Cradle to Cradle” (and we thought ‘Cradle to Grave’ was sufficient – that’s how quickly the world is changing), “The best stats you’ve ever seen”, “The paradox of choice”, “How co-operation (eventually) trumps conflict”, “The power and beauty of organic design” and “how I built my family a windmill”, among many others. Listening to the talks is a matter of visiting the ted.com website and choosing by themes, talks or speakers, or searching in iTunes and subscribing. In the coming weeks, I hope to expand on some of my favourite TED talks and encourage you to visit the site. www.ted.com  Ron Levesque

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Circle of Life - This week we will explore urban farming as a follow-up to last week’s Circle of Life that discussed rooftop gardens.  Urban farms serve a number of important roles in a community.  Some are a community garden and meeting place, an educational area where children can learn about agriculture and the history of an area, a food supply for a neighborhood, a local business growing and supplying food and providing employment, or a way to preserve the agricultural history of an area. 

Recently I discovered an urban farm in my own backyard in Halifax, NS, the Urban Farm Museum Society of Spryfield.  The Society is currently looking for volunteers.  http://www.saltscapes.com/content/view/58/64/

Find out if there is urban farming in your backyard and for more examples of urban farming, check out these links:  http://urbanfarming.org/     http://www.dott07.com/go/food/urban-farming  http://www.kccua.org/

 – Bronwyn MacKinnon

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What is Your Vision Statement?  –This week, a vision statement from OnPoint Community Credit Union, Portland, Oregon. Its vision is to: engage and retain mutually beneficial long-term relationships with members, employees, volunteers, business partners and communities, exhibit distinguished leadership in delivering unsurpassed, sustained member value, provide outstanding financial returns to our membership by delivering totally reliable and competitively superior financial services, vest employees with the responsibility and authority to deliver superior member service, encourage members to assume greater responsibility for achieving their financial goals, serve the needs of our membership without regard to technological or geographical limitations and pursue avenues for increased and sustainable growth. http://www.onpointcu.com/htm/info.html Send your co-operative or credit union vision statement to News1@nbnet.nb.ca

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Young Co-operators: The Buds on the Co-op Tree - The Canadian Co-operative Association has selected the nine youth they are sending abroad to support co-operative and community development: Andres Gouldsborough (Montreal, QC), Sonja Carriere (Russel, ON),  Maya Nakajima (Vancouver, BC), Caitlin Furtado (Kirkland, QC), Danielle White (Saskatoon, SK), Jennifer Muldoon (Ottawa, ON), Aimee Charest (Ottawa, ON), Jordana Ramalho (Guelph, ON), Mathieu Rioux (Ottawa, ON).

This year’s partner countries include Ghana, Uganda, Malawi and Kenya. Projects will address issues such as HIV/AIDS, gender, technology, food security and the interns will work with such organizations as Social Enterprise Development Foundation of West Africa, Credit Union Association of Ghana and more. “CCA’s Youth Experience International Program offers young graduates the work experience they need to secure good jobs - in Canada or abroad. It also provides them with an opportunity to discover the world and themselves.”  For more information on CCA’s Youth Experience International program, please consult CCA’s website http://www.coopscanada.coop/coopdevelopment/internationaldev/youthexperience/ or contact Monique Charron, Program Officer, (613)238-6711, ext. 224. – Erin Hancock

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You CAN Do That the ‘Co-op’ Way - Each week, we feature a co-operative or collective formed to meet a particular need in communities around the world. WindShare is an innovative, for-profit wind power co-operative, the first of its kind in Canada. Located in Toronto, ON, WindShare develops locally owned wind power projects that are scaled to the size and characteristics of the host community. WindShare’s mission is to demonstrate leadership and action in the community wind power sector, and to develop community power projects that are sustainable economically, environmentally, and socially. WindShare provides an alternative to large, centralized energy generation with the development of local, profitable and inclusive community power projects. http://www.windshare.ca/about/about_windshare.html

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Co-op Community Bulletin Board

·     August 23-26 - Frame X Week, Halifax, NS. There will be a series of public screenings, visiting artists’ talks and workshops. For more information, contact the Atlantic Filmmakers Coop at 420-4572, or visit www.afcoop.ca or e-mail production@afcoop.ca

·     September 27-30 – Atlantic Co-operative Youth Leadership camp,  Camp Gencheff, PEI http://www.acyl.coop/english/index.htm

Remember to send news items and bulletin board items to News1@nbnet.nb.ca

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Contest of the week – Last week, our first correct answer was from Melanie Conn, BC. (Melanie added,  “Assuming the lion doesn’t scare everyone else away”) Contest entry deadline each week is Tuesday, 12 noon.  Send your answer to contest1@nbnet.nb.ca.  All entries will be placed in the “Contest Can” for the month end draw. Last week’s contest and answer: A lion takes 4 hours to eat one sheep, a leopard takes 5 hours and a bear takes 6. If a single sheep was thrown to them, how long would they take to devour it?  Answer:  60/37 hours (about 1.64). In one hour a lion eats 1/4 of a sheep, a leopard eats 1/5 and a bear 1/6. So in one hour combined they eat 1/4 + 1/5 + 1/6 sheep. Therefore one sheep will take 1 / (1/4 + 1/5 + 1/6) hours = 60/37. This week’s contest: In which sport do winners move backwards and losers move forwards?

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Today I Learned Something New: International Development Through the Eyes of Students - During the year, as part of my work with the Canadian Co-operative Association, I visit schools and talk about co-operatives and communities in developing countries. I always appreciate the insights of the students, shared through comment sheets.  From Joey, NB: “I liked the presentation because it really helped me understand what goes on in different countries and cultures. I liked seeing the clothing. It was cool to get the coin at the end of class from the Philippines. Thank you.”

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Co-op Ed 101 - Recently I had the opportunity to meet the staff and learn about the Saint John Community Loan Fund. It began as an idea in 1996 at a meeting of the Urban Core Support Network. The individuals around the table spoke of the need for community credit. This credit could help people living on low income start a business or get back to work. The idea stuck, and within months the Human Development Council conducted a feasibility study and wrote a business plan that showed there was a market and an opportunity to establish a community loan fund in Saint John. Read about the fund and the good work it has been able to do. http://www.loanfund.ca/about_us.html  For more information, contact the Saint John Community Loan Fund 3rd Floor City Market, P.O. Box 6125 , Station A Saint John , NB E2L 4R6 Email: loanfund@nbnet.nb.ca Fax: (506)636-8543.

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Co-op Cooking – Here is another summertime favourite.
Chicken Kabobs
4 skinless, boneless chicken breasts cut into pieces
whole mushrooms
green and red peppers, cut into chunks
canned pineapple chunks, drained
4 small onions, cut into quarters
Any other vegetable or fruit item you desire
Mix one of the following sauces:
1/2 cup Catalina dressing
2 to 3 tbsp soya sauce
1/2 to 1 tsp ground ginger
or
1/2 cup whipped salad dressing
1/4 cup orange juice
1 tsp thyme
or
1/2 cup barbecue sauce
1/4 cup crushed pineapple, undrained
1 clove garlic, crushed
If using wooden skewers, soak them in water for 1/2 hour. Thread chicken pieces on skewers alternating with vegetable and/or fruit pieces. Wrap ends of skewers in foil to prevent burning. Barbecue or grill until chicken is cooked through, turning and brushing frequently with chosen sauce. To avoid meat and vegetables falling from ends of skewers, always pick them up in the middle. Serve with cooked rice and a tossed salad.
Note - you can leave the chicken breasts whole and cook them to be served as a sandwich, or cut diagonally and served on a salad. Happy cooking everyone. -  Glenna Weagle

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Our Readers Write - Tell us what you think. Send news, events and information for the Co-op Community Bulletin Board. Suggest features you think might be beneficial to people reading Co-op Circles. We want this electronic newsletter to serve you (be sure to include your e-mail and phone number). Send your item(s), comments and suggestions to News1@nbnet.nb.ca 

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Co-op Circles is part of Rising Tide Collective’s commitment to the Co-op Principles of Co-op Education and Concern for Community. This electronic newsletter is published every week. It is available free of charge to anyone with an e-mail address and an interest in co-operative and community development in Atlantic Canada and around the worldWe will be happy to put you on our Co-op Circles mailing list. We are proud that co-operators from Canada, the U.S, England, the Philippines, Australia and New Zealand are part of our Circle. To subscribe: circles1@nbnet.nb.ca or to unsubscribe: circles2@nbnet.nb.ca  Tell your friends about it. Please e-mail us with your questions, suggestions and memories at News1@nbnet.nb.ca

Thanks to the Marie Michael Library, Coady International Institute, for archiving Co-op Circles. http://www.coady.stfx.ca/library/coop_circles/index.htm 

 

Next Co-op Circles: Wednesday, August 15, 2007