Week of Aug. 26 – Sept. 1, 2007, Vol. 2, No. 45

Edited and Compiled for you, by the Rising Tide Collective

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Openings“We all need to work for a world in which peace, health and social justice are the rule - not the exception.” - Matthias Rath www.drrathresearch.org  Openings is a weekly feature of Co-op Circles. Send your favourite quote about celebrating co-operatives, communities and a better world for all, to News1@nbnet.nb.ca

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This Week in Co-op Circles

·     “The plight of a beef processing facility on Prince Edward Island seems to exemplify the difficulties being faced by an industry that has been in crisis for far too long. While Co-op Atlantic does stock Atlantic beef in small quantities, Superstore and Sobeys for the most part don’t, meaning most consumers in larger centres – including Truro – can not purchase locally-produced beef from one of the grocery giants.” See the complete story at  http://www.atlanticfarmfocus.ca/index.cfm?iid=2733&sid=23952)

·     Stefan Joseph Henry Haley, 1944-2007, of Kentville, NS, passed away Friday, August 17, 2007 in Mountain Lea Lodge, Bridgetown, NS. He had been employed as a freelance writer and was most recently working in Korea as an editorial consultant to the Senior Editor of YBM Publications, which included CNN, Newsweek, and National Geographic. Many people in the co-op retail system will remember that Haley wrote  Tested By Fire: The Life and Work of W.H. McEwen in 1980. McEwen was a former general manager of Co-op Atlantic. Condolences and more details can be found at http://www.whitefamilyfuneralhome.com/obituaries/30227

·     Valley Credit Union http://www.valleycreditunion.com) in Nova Scotia’s Annapolis Valley, held its 3rd Annual Valley Credit Union Charity Golf tournament on August 20th. It was a success with great prizes, sponsorship and weather.  The credit union raised more than $5,000 this year, which brings its total commitment to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind close to $12,000 during the past three years!  The credit union staff and board extend their gratitude for the support by prize donors, volunteers, sponsors, golfers and the Greenwood Golf Club.

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Trends – I suppose you could fault Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Danny Williams for airing his federal dirty laundry, but you have to give him and his tourism people full marks for a portion of his province’s tourism strategy. You see, summer tourism strategies are usually hammered out in the fall or winter prior to summer, and one of the things that features prominently in their campaign this year is…clotheslines and fresh air. Big deal, you say? Turns out, it’s becoming one. There is a trend beginning to pick up speed around the world for the return of the simple clothesline. Once seen as ‘lower class’, more and more people are turning to the clothesline to dry their clothes and to make a point, especially in housing developments that have covenants banning the use of clotheslines. The electric clothes dryer is one of the most power-hungry appliances you can own, and not using a clothes dryer will go a little way in using less electricity. But with all the scientific breakthroughs available to modern consumers, I say the best reason to use a clothesline is still the fresh scent of the outdoors when you don that shirt, dry yourself off with that towel or slip into those bedsheets that hung outside and dried for free. No amount of artificial fragrances (some would say ‘cancer-causing’) can even come close to what fresh air can do.  See http://www.newfoundlandlabrador.com/About/OurCulturalHeritage/FreshAir.aspx for Newfoundland and Labrador’s ‘fresh air’ campaign. For more on the ‘Right to Dry’ movement, simply enter those words in Google. Ron Levesque

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Circle of Life - This week, a look at a worker co-op that has taken an environmental, community focused approach.  Green Worker Cooperatives is a South Bronx-based organization dedicated to incubating worker-owned and environmentally friendly co-operatives in the South Bronx area of New York City. They are currently developing their first co-operative, ReBuilders Source, a retail warehouse for surplus and salvaged building materials recovered from construction and demolition jobs.  Check out http://greenworker.coop/ for more information on this innovative, community minded co-op. Don’t forget to keep sending your Waste Not tips to news1@nbnet.nb.ca  We will be receiving these for the next couple of weeks.– Bronwyn MacKinnon

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What is Your Vision Statement?  –This week, a vision statement from the Positive Power Co-op, a passionate group of community leaders in Ontario who are committed to putting “wings in the sky”. Their vision is “a healthy and sustainable environment through community-based renewable energy”. http://www.positivepowerco-op.com/about/wings.htm Send your co-operative or credit union vision statement to News1@nbnet.nb.ca

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Young Co-operators: The Buds on the Co-op Tree  - The North American Students of Co-operation have recently undated their website, so you may visit their ‘Welcome’ site at http://nasco.coop/node/390. The group “organizes and educates affordable group equity co-ops and their members for the purpose of promoting a community oriented cooperative movement.” They have a Shared Resource Library offering co-operative information, found at http://www.nasco.coop/resources/. It offers a variety of resources for those wishing to learn more about co-ops. The site is also designed to encourage co-operatives to exercise user ownership over the site content by offering the ability to add and change content on the site. – Erin Hancock

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Today I Learned Something New: International Development Through the Eyes of Students - During the year, as part of my work with the Canadian Co-operative Association, I visit schools and talk about co-operatives and communities in developing countries. I always appreciate the insights of the students, shared through comment sheets.  From Ashlie, PEI, Grade 6: “In your presentation I really liked the things that you brought in to show, especially the worry doll and wonderful weaving. I also liked that you had pictures of the schools.”

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You CAN Do That the ‘Co-op’ Way - Each week, we feature a co-operative or collective formed to meet a particular need in communities around the world.  Syinurayi Collective Farming Co-operative is located in the Cashel Valley, Manicaland Province, Zimbabwe. It has 24 members and is situated in a community of just less than 100 people. The objectives of the co-operative are: to develop agricultural inputs in the area, improve the living standards of the members, become self reliant, and process farm produce to finished goods. http://www.learningcentre.coop/co-ops_featured.php#farm

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Co-op Community Bulletin Board

·     September 27-30 – Atlantic Co-operative Youth Leadership camp,  Camp Gencheff, PEI http://www.acyl.coop/english/index.htm

Remember to send news items and bulletin board items to News1@nbnet.nb.ca

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Contest of the week – We had 10 correct entries last week.  The first to arrive was from Yvonne MacKey, Co-op Taxi, St. John’s, NL.  Congratulations! Contest entry deadline each week is Tuesday, 12 noon.  Send your answer to contest1@nbnet.nb.ca.  All entries will be place in the “Contest Can” for the month end draw. Last week’s contest: What comes next in this sequence: dog, goat, tarantula, aardvark, koala. Choose from: cat, mouse, antelope, elephant. Answer:  Antelope - the next word starts with the last letter of the former word. This week’s contest is a bit harder. Traffic was bad going to work this morning. I only managed to average 30 mph. How fast must I go home tonight, along the same route, to average 60 mph for the entire round trip?

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Co-op Ed 101 - I subscribe to a listserv for worker co-ops (workercoop@yahoogroups.com).  Recently, Cortes Natural Food Co-op, a hybrid co-op on Cortes Island, B.C., caught my attention. It has about 450 members who pay (in addition to purchasing a share), an annual fee of $30 to keep prices affordable. There are about 25 workers (not all year round) annually who are paid wages and members. The co-op sells groceries, healthcare items, locally grown produce, locally made crafts and supports local businesses. The board consists of a maximum of 9 directors of which at least 50 per cent are workers. Its role is not so much the day to day running of the co-op as to be the overseer who ensure that the interests of the three parties (consumer-members/worker-member/local producer-business-members) are balanced. After four years of business, the co-op store has changed the island's buying habits to more organic, more local and fewer ferry trips to a larger town for shopping. I could not find a web site for the co-op, just the community of Cortes Island http://www.vancouverisland.com/Regions/towns/?townID=212

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Co-op Cooking – These days the garden is producing an abundance of produce and it seems the most bountiful plant is the zucchini. These veggies seem to grow, overnight, to 6 or 8 inches, and occasionally hide under the leaves until you discover one that could easily substitute for a baseball bat. Friends and neighbours can only handle so much of this abundancy. So if you own a zucchini plant, you are always looking for new ways to use them. Perhaps you haven’t tried this one yet:
Chocolate Zucchini Cake
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1 1/3 cups sugar
4 tbsp cocoa powder
2 eggs
2 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 cup sour milk
2 cups grated zucchini
Mix oil, sugar, cocoa and eggs until well combined. Add flour alternately with sour milk, beginning and ending with flour. Add soda and cinnamon to first addition of flour. Stir in zucchini. Pour into greased, floured, fluted pan. Bake at 350 for 40 to 50 minutes; tester should come out clean. Cool on wire rack 5 minutes. Remove from pan and complete cooling on rack. Tip: Dust your pan with a little cocoa powder instead of flour and your chocolate cakes will have a rich brown look.-  Glenna Weagle

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Our Readers Write - Tell us what you think. Send news, events and information for the Co-op Community Bulletin Board. Suggest features you think might be beneficial to people reading Co-op Circles. We want this electronic newsletter to serve you (be sure to include your e-mail and phone number). Send your item(s), comments and suggestions to News1@nbnet.nb.ca 

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Co-op Circles is part of Rising Tide Collective’s commitment to the Co-op Principles of Co-op Education and Concern for Community. This electronic newsletter is published every week. It is available free of charge to anyone with an e-mail address and an interest in co-operative and community development in Atlantic Canada and around the worldWe will be happy to put you on our Co-op Circles mailing list. We are proud that co-operators from Canada, the U.S, England, the Philippines, Australia and New Zealand are part of our Circle. To subscribe: circles1@nbnet.nb.ca or to unsubscribe: circles2@nbnet.nb.ca  Tell your friends about it. Please e-mail us with your questions, suggestions and memories at News1@nbnet.nb.ca

Thanks to the Marie Michael Library, Coady International Institute, for archiving Co-op Circles. http://www.coady.stfx.ca/library/coop_circles/index.htm 

 

Next Co-op Circles: Wednesday, September 5, 2007